Gathering Storm First Review

Introductory Thoughts

The eagerly awaited expansion for Civilization VI arrived as announce on February 14, 2019. I’ve now played three complete games, and finally am starting to get a better feel for all the changes.

Simply put, I really like this expansion!

All the changes from previous versions appear to have been well thought through. They add significant complexity while enhancing enjoyment, especially in the late game.

Weather incidents, natural disasters, and global warming add new dimensions that have intriguing upsides as well as negative consequences. Having a choice on the disaster intensity level for natural disasters is another new wrinkle. There are four levels, with the default being 2. So far, I have played only the default level, but eventually will try the others.

While there are several technical changes and fixes to the user interface, I found the build queue in each city production screen the most practical and found myself using it almost constantly.

The new civs and leaders are all very strong.

Once again, my goal is to win a game playing each of the new civs. More or less arbitrarily, I’ve decided to just work alphabetically as the leaders are listed in the game itself. (When starting a new game and selecting the civ, they are listed by leader name.)

That means my first three games were Dido of Phoenicia, Eleanor of Aquitaine (England), and Kristina of Sweden. In the 2nd game, I opted for England with Eleanor this time. (One of the new features, never before done in any of the Civ games, is one leader for two different civilizations. Historically, Eleanor was queen of France and also England depending who she was married to at different times, so one can choose either of those civs when selecting her as the leader.)

Game 1: Phoenicia (Dido)

With Dido, my plan from the outset was to try to balance Science and Culture per turn and decide later which to focus on as a victory condition. Eventually I settled on going for a Science victory, so I could learn the changes to pursuing that victory condition.

Dido (Phoenicia) Game Play settings:

  • Start Era: Ancient Era
  • Difficulty Level: Prince
  • Game Pace: Standard (500 turns)
  • Map Type: Continents
  • Map Size: Standard
  • Disaster Intensity: 2
  • Other Civs: Random, turned out to be (in order I met them)
    • Inca
    • France
    • Hungary
    • Maori
    • Mali
    • Sweden
    • Ottomans

After muddling along and learning from a number of mistakes that slowed me down, I finally was able to win with Dido by completing the final space project on turn 426.

Game 2: England (Eleanor of Aquitaine)

This one was different from the start, in that I intended to go for a Culture victory.

Eleanor (England) Game Play settings:

  • Start Era: Ancient Era
  • Difficulty Level: Prince
  • Game Pace: Standard (500 turns)
  • Map Type: Continents
  • Map Size: Standard
  • Disaster Intensity: 2
  • Other Civs: Random, turned out to be (in order I met them)
    • Australia
    • Mongolia
    • America
    • China
    • Canada
    • Phoenicia
    • Japan

Again, I balanced Science and Culture in the early game. I focused on getting as many Wonders as I could, expecting they would lead to the Culture victory. Unfortunately, I ended up with fewer Theater Districts and more Campuses and try as I might, the Culture victory was elusive. For a while, I had viable options for winning with Culture, Science, Points and even Diplomatic, but was too impatient to wait out a Points victory and settled for another Science victory, this time at turn 404.

I learned some important strategies for better use of Diplomatic Favor and earning/buy Diplomatic Points that will certainly be helpful when I decide to focus completely on a Diplomatic victory. I also learned how to use some great late game options, including Rock Bands, that makes it more important to develop Faith throughout the game to have enough for obtaining them.

Ultimately, it appears to win in Gathering Storm, one cannot ignore any of the aspects of the game. It is important to have at least minimal growth in everything.

Without being aware of it early enough, I was the world’s major carbon producer (over 50% of total, mostly coal use, but also some oil use). That became a detriment for Diplomatic Favor and by the time I realized how to do some mitigation, it was too late to have a big enough impact.

Game 3: Sweden (Kristina)

Determined to achieve a Cultural victory, from the very beginning all choices were made to optimize Culture as well as Science, as Kristina has unique abilities related to both.

Kristina (Sweden) Game Play settings:

  • Start Era: Ancient Era
  • Difficulty Level: Prince
  • Game Pace: Standard (500 turns)
  • Map Type: Continents
  • Map Size: Standard
  • Disaster Intensity: 2
  • Other Civs: Random turned out to be (in order I met them)
    • Canada
    • Mongolia
    • Maori
    • Japan
    • Khmer
    • Georgia
    • Mapuche

This time, the plan worked very well. Culture Victory came on turn 351, substantially sooner than the other two games. Kristina is overpowered if focused on enhancing Culture and building Wonders, especially those with Great Work slots.

My location on the map helped as well. I was able to settle a number of cities, while eventually defeating Mongolia to add several more cities and keep a major portion of the continent in my possession. Only Canada and Mongolia were originals on the continent, with the Maori the only civ to settle a few cities on the continent later.

Hat Tip to Helpful Videos

Before the official release of Gathering Storm, the Firaxis developers posted weekly videos featuring one of the new Civs and highlighting many of the changes and additions to the game. These were not only extremely helpful in learning the new aspects of the game, but were also quite entertaining.

One other “go to” YouTube site for game play explanations and play throughs is Marbozir. His entertaining videos using the pre-release version in advance of February 14 (and since, actually) have been terrific tutorials while seeing how a full game develops beginning to end.

I highly recommend both if you are just digging in to Gathering Storm (or Civ VI for that matter).

Next Up Kupe of the Maori!

 

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Outlook Profiles

Once again a technical glitch has led to some significant learning about some of the features of Outlook 2016 I had not used before, mostly because I did think I had a need to do so.

The Technical Issue

The issue that triggered some minor panic was a “phantom” message that Outlook was trying to send from the primary account and producing an error every time a send/receive command was initiated. I may have inadvertently caused the problem when a message was stuck in the outbox and efforts to manually initiate send/receive commands did not work.

Attempted Solutions

I had a similar problem occur a while back and eventually the solution that worked was changing the primary account to another one and deleting the original primary account .pst file. Then installing a new account using that email address and keeping it as a secondary account.

This time, in hopes of not having to do that tedious procedure again, I tried deleting the stuck message (after copy and pasting its contents to a new message) and trying to send the new message. That did not work as it got stuck in the outbox too. I then just closed Outlook and reopened it, hoping it would then send upon startup. It did, but that is when the “phantom message” was trying to be sent and caused send errors every time. I tried taking the deleted message and moving it to the outbox, but that did not work.

I suspected the problem may then be my service provider (same as cable/internet provider) so I called them. They were unable to resolve the problem, kicked it up to a higher-level tech person, but they said their preliminary analysis was the problem was with Outlook.

Then decided I was going to have to go through the change of primary account again, delete the .pst file and start over. Unfortunately, I made the mistake of changing the name of the default .pst file to keep its contents and then Outlook simply would not startup at all. A error message came up and it was clear, after multiple tries, it was not going to work. This is what caused the minor panic.

My first idea to resolve the new issue was to reinstall Outlook, which actually meant reinstalling the whole Office 2016 suite. After doing that, Outlook still did not open.

Eventual Successful Solution

I went online to see if there was any help available through forums, and found one idea – creating a new Outlook profile – that looked promising. After learning how to do that and creating a new profile, I started by installing the email account I wanted as the primary (default) account and was relieved when the send/receive worked fine with no errors (confirming the original problem was an Outlook not an internet provider problem). I then simply added the other account .pst files as additional accounts.

Since I had backed up the various email folders, RSS feeds, tasks, and calendar I was able to restore them quite easily. Unfortunately, I had not yet learned how to export the rules I had set up, so those I had to rebuild from scratch. In the process, I have now learned how to export the rules to an .rwz file, so I have backups should I need to yet again start a new profile.

Ironic Conclusion

I was aware for years of the concept of more than one profile for email because I have used multiple profiles in Thunderbird to make it easier to organize various email accounts, but it never occurred to me the same could be done with Outlook. For some reason, I had never paid attention to the option of multiple profiles in Outlook.

I suspect one reason is my first uses of Outlook were on an Exchange Server of my employer and I was the only user of my one account so never even used multiple accounts in Outlook until probably when I upgraded to Office 2007 on my home computer way back when.

Anyway, this set of technical challenges led me to learn about profiles in Outlook, as well as saving and reloading backups of the rules via export/import. I also re-learned I had an opml file to use to import the RSS feeds. Good lessons learned.