Firefox Certificates Glitch

A few weeks ago, when considering whether or not to restart blogging here, I found an old draft of a post from May 5, 2019 that never was published to the blog. I have hesitated to publish it now over two years later, but I think for my own benefit to remember old tech problems, it will be useful to do so. Back then, a major problem occurred using Firefox. Before finally publishing my draft now, I decided to find what version of Firefox was current back in early May 2019 and discovered the Wikipedia Firefox Version History. According to that, it was most likely Firefox 66.

Following is my May 5, 2019 draft:

A couple of days ago Firefox suddenly disabled all add-ons. I tried closing and reopening it, then tried uninstalling and reinstalling, all to no avail. The instructions given in the general help section said to delete and install the add-ons again. I tried that and was able to uninstall them, but not reinstall. It kept coming up with errors.

Next, I went online checking user forums and found that it had been identified as a glitch in the software and eventually it would be fixed. That was Friday night.

I checked again Saturday and found a comment that said it was fixed, but one had to allow Firefox to install and run studies. I did so, then was able to install all the add-ons I use again.

Most time consuming was reinstalling the feed reader, Feedbro. It was easy enough to get the addon, but it turned out I lost all the feeds I was using. I don’t know if I would have been able to recover them if I had not uninstalled it, but suspect I might have been able to.

This is the worst issue I’ve had using Firefox. The most confusing part of it was the glitch happened suddenly and not as a result of an update.

End of May 5, 2019 draft

My wife and I both continue to use Firefox and have had no problems since. A while back, we also began to use our own profiles making it much easier to navigate with our preferred bookmarks present.

Browsers

On the two PC’s, we use three browsers regularly – Mozilla Firefox, Chrome, Microsoft Edge.

My preference is Firefox, not the least because it is open source. I’ve always been a fan of open source as a concept and try to support software that continues in that vein. Another reason is it is less a resource hog than Chrome. If one uses a browser while gaming (I often do with Minecraft), a smaller program is helpful to keeping computing power focused on the game.

For years Chrome was my preference, but as it has grown in size and complexity, I like it less. My wife is used to it, so that is set as the default browser on the desktop.

Microsoft Edge has one advantage – it is generally faster than other browsers. However, the way I use bookmarks, it is woefully inadequate for folders, sub-folders, etc. I use it relatively rarely on both machines, but sometimes it is useful.

The first browser I ever used was Mosaic. Then soon after, Netscape and Internet Explorer were the best options. I always preferred Netscape back then. Over the years I used several others, including Opera, Pale Moon, and the SeaMonkey suite, but eventually settled on Chrome and Firefox.

I should note on the iPad, I’ve used Safari (don’t like it), Chrome, and Mercury. I very much prefer Mercury, so use that almost exclusively now.

Software Overview

In the next series of posts, I intend to discuss some of the software programs (these days called ‘apps’) I have used in the past or continue to use regularly, if not daily. I will group them by type or purpose and write separate posts for each group.

These are the groups I’ve decided upon, at least for now:

  • Security
  • Browsers
  • Mail
  • Productivity
  • Photo Management
  • Utility
  • Communication

Most people use software in each of these groups, but some of what I have encountered and use (or used) for specific purposes might be new to the reader.